Posted by: crisdiaz24 | October 24, 2009

GREAT WALLS unit 2

A GUIDE TO GREAT WALLS

Resilient: (of a substance) returning to its original shape after being bent, stretched, or pressed. Elástico.

Threat: the possibility of trouble, danger or disaster.

To fall into disrepair: a building, road, etc. that is in a state of disrepair has not been taken care of and is broken or in bad condition. Deteriorarse.

Site: a place where a building, town, etc. was, is or will be located.

Barbed wire: strong wire with short sharp points on it, used especially for fences. Alambre de espino.

Within: before a particular period of time has passed; during a particular period of time.

Concrete: building material that is made by mixing together cement, sand, small stones and water.

Breakthrough: a way through sthg using force.

Ditch: a long channel dug at the side of a field or road, to hold or take away water.

Deterrent: a thing that makes sby less likely to do sthg (= that deters them). Elemento disuasorio.

Would-be: [only before noun] used to describe sby who is hoping to become the type of person mentioned.

To flee-fled-fled: to run away, to escape.

To prevail: to exist or be very common at a particular time or in a particular place.

Via: by means of a particular person, system, etc.

To lift (a restriction): to remove or end restrictions.

Stretch: an area of land or water, especially a long one.

To take down: to remove a structure, especially by separating it into pieces.

Housing: houses, flats / apartments, etc. that people live in, especially when referring to their type, price or condition.

Man-made: made by people; not natural; artificial.

Outer space: the area outside the earth’s atmosphere where all the other planets and stars are.

BC: Before Christ.

Forced labour: hard physical work that sby, often a prisoner or slave, is forced to do.

Layer: a quantity or thickness of sthg that lies over a surface or between surfaces.

To crumble: if a building or piece of land is crumbling, parts of it are breaking off.

To evolve: to develop gradually, especially from a simple to a more complicated form; to develop sthg in this way.

Marauding: [only before noun] (of people or animals) going around a place in search of things to steal or people to attack. To maraud: saquear, merodear.

Haven: a place that is safe and peaceful where people or animals are protected. Refugio, puerto, remanso.

Bustling: (with sthg) full of people moving about in a busy way.

To spring up: to appear or develop quickly and/or suddenly.

Ornate: covered with a lot of decoration, especially when this involves very small or complicated designs.

Feat: an action or a piece of work that needs skill, strength or courage.

Arguably: used, often before a comparative or superlative adjective, when you are stating an opinion which you believe you could give reasons to support. Posiblemente, podría decirse.

AD: Anno Domini. Después de Cristo.

ON the orders of

Northernmost: furthest north.

Boundary: a real or imagined line that marks the limits or edges of sthg and separates it from other things or places; a dividing line.

Fort: a building or buildings built in order to defend an area against attack.

Turret: a small tower on top of a wall or building, especially a castle.

Milecastle: a small fort (fortlet), a rectangular fortification built during the period of the Romans. They were placed at intervals of approximately one Roman mile along several major frontiers.

Glimpse: when you see something or someone for a very short time.

Alongside: next to or at the side of sthg.

Throughout: during the whole period of time of sthg.

Gateway: an opening in a wall or fence that can be closed by a gate.

Guild: an association of skilled workers in the Middle Ages.

Toll: money that you pay to use a particular road or bridge.

To dwindle: to become gradually less or smaller.

To dismantle: to take apart a machine or structure so that it is in separate pieces

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