Posted by: crisdiaz24 | February 20, 2011

TEST UNIT 2 NEW ENGLISH FILE ADVANCED

GRAMMAR

1   Complete the sentences with the correct form of the verb in brackets.

Example:    I’d like to tell you about something that happened (happen) when I was 12.

1   While my dad ________ (drive) home from work, a cat ran in front of his car.

2   I ________ (work) in the café for four months when I finally received my wages.

3   I was having dinner when I ________ (decide) to call Ellen.

4   The weather ________ (expect) to be stormy next weekend.

5   It ________ (say) that taking a nap after lunch is very healthy.

6   There is thought ________ (be) undiscovered oil beneath the Antarctic.

6

2   Complete the sentences with the correct word(s).

Example: Your brother seems to have got himself in trouble.

did get    have got    got

1   It’s ________ late. We should leave soon.

get    getting    got

2   My backache ________ every time I lie down.

getting worse    got worse    gets worse

3   I don’t think I’ll ever ________ to taking the underground.

get use    get used    to get use

4   Brian ________ trying to take a video camera into the concert.

got caught someone    was got caught    got caught

5   I’d like ________ a professional to fill in my tax forms.

to get    get    got

6   Could you get Adnan ________ me a call, please?

give    to give    giving

 

6

3   Underline the correct word(s).

Example:    It’s been announced / announced that our pay will increase next year.

1   We used / would to make ice cream every summer.

2   When I was at school, my friends and I were always gone / going for long bike rides in the afternoon.

3   My dad would never complain / to complain even when we made a lot of noise.

4   It’s appear / It appears that the office is closed.

5   It would seems / seem that Bertrand has stolen Ferdinand’s bicycle.

6   Apparently / According to the newspaper, the economy is going to improve next year.

7   The robbers may have / might be escaped by motorcycle.

8   Pete is understood to / understood have written a postcard from Paris.

 

8
Grammar total 20

VOCABULARY

4   Complete the words in the sentences.

Example:    I believe in ghosts. My uncle once told the story of a spectre that he had seen in the window of an old house.

1   I have a positive o________ on life and I don’t worry too much.

2   He stays up until midnight every night? No w________ he falls asleep in class!

3   We were so e________ in conversation, we didn’t notice that the restaurant had closed.

4   She lives in a quiet n________ of a small city in northern Spain.

5   I p________ messages on Facebook once or twice a week.

6   The artist’s work was r________ by reviewers, who said it was ‘silly’, ‘awful to look at’, and ‘bad’.

7   I hate dogs. I am really afraid of them and I know they can smell my f________.

8   I thought Susan and Tom were a good m________, but they broke up last week.

8

5   Choose two words and put them together to make compound nouns. Do not add extra words.

Example:    a … confined / big / turn-off a big turn-off

1   a … long-term / dumped / relationship a ________

2   a … juggling / time-saving / gadget a ________

3   a … hard / waste / time a ________

4   the … time of / time being / your life the ________

5   some … time / off / up some ________

6   a … spare / question / of time a ________

6

6   Underline the correct word(s).

Example: I got a shock / the impression when everyone yelled surprise!

1   When we went to Spain, Eric spent the whole / much time in our hotel room.

2   I hope my cousin can get her act out / together. Right now, she’s got a lot of problems.

3   I hate getting told off / on in front of people. It’s so embarrassing.

4   I’m afraid you got the wrong end of the stick / fire. We don’t want to buy the house, we want to sell it.

5   The best way to get around / back town is by bicycle.

6   I hope we can get out away / out of going to the meeting next Monday.

6
Vocabulary total 20

PRONUNCIATION

7   Match the words with the same sound.

waste rite   gadget   believe   peak   friendship

Example:    take waste

1   wisdom ________

2   splendid ________

3   compete ________, ________

4   wise ________

5

8   Underline the stressed syllable.

Example: message

1   boredom

2   overcome

3   crowning

4   partnership

5   revenge

5
Pronunciation total 10
Grammar, Vocabulary, and Pronunciation total 50

READING

Read the article and tick (ü) A, B, or C.

A STUDY OF MULTITASKING

Technology increasingly makes it possible for people to do more than one task at a time, for example moving between browsing the Web and using other computer programs, talking on mobile phones while driving, or flying a jet and monitoring air traffic. Indeed, the word describing this – ‘multitasking’ – has gone from being invented to being commonly used in everyday life in a remarkably short time. A recent study has looked at whether multitasking is purely beneficial or has its downside, especially when the tasks being done together are complicated ones.

The researchers concluded that when people are multitasking, they are using what they call ‘executive control’ processes. These processes concern different parts of the brain and involve the brain allocating different mental resources to different tasks and deciding which tasks are more important than others. The brain’s executive control gives the appropriate resources to the different aspects of tasks, such as understanding what the task requires, thinking about what to do, and taking action.

The researchers conducted an experiment into how much time was lost when people repeatedly switched between two tasks. The tasks varied in terms of how complex they were and how familiar the subjects were with doing those tasks, and they included such things as solving mathematical problems and classifying geometric objects. The researchers measured how long it took the subjects to carry out the tasks and considered the speed in connection with whether the tasks were familiar or unfamiliar, and whether the rules for doing them were simple or complicated.

The results of the experiments were the same for every kind of task. In each case, the subjects lost time when they moved from one task to another, and the amount of time they lost increased when the tasks were complex or unfamiliar. When they were familiar with a task, they were able to adapt to changing to it and get on with it much more quickly. The researchers say that these results indicate that the brain’s executive control consists of two separate stages. They called the first stage ‘goal shifting’, meaning a preference to do one of the tasks rather than the other at a particular moment. The second stage they named ‘rule activation’, meaning moving from engaging with the rules associated with how to go about one task to engaging with the rules involved in doing the other task. The second stage, rule activation, takes a significant amount of time, and this delay multiplies when people keep switching between tasks. The result is that quite a lot of time is lost when multitasking, in comparison with the time that would be taken if each task was completed separately.

This has major implications for multitasking, suggesting that although people may think that it saves time without affecting efficiency, in reality it actually takes more time, and this may have an adverse effect on efficiency. In the case of someone using a mobile phone while driving, multitasking could mean that they are not in full control of their vehicle during the short period when they are switching to using the phone.

The researchers feel that their research has important consequences for multitasking. Their conclusions regarding executive control and how it works may, they believe, help people to look for strategies that will enable them to operate in the most efficient way possible when they are multitasking. And an understanding of executive mental control could have an impact on the design of the technology involved in such areas as operating aircraft and air traffic control, as well as other activities where the interface between humans and computers is crucial to efficiency.

In addition, there are other possible applications of this research. Understanding how people function while multitasking could assist with recruitment, training and assessment of personnel in the workplace. It could also have an influence on government and industrial regulations, assist in the diagnosis and treatment of brain-damaged patients, and increase our general understanding of how the brain works.

1   What does the writer suggest about the word ‘multitasking’?

A  It has changed in meaning since it was invented.

B  It is not always used appropriately.

C  Its increased use reflects a change in everyday life.

2   The aim of the research was to ________.

A  compare the advantages and disadvantages of multitasking

B  discover why multitasking is regarded a wholly good thing

C  find out if there are any negative effects of multitasking

3   The researchers use the term ‘executive control’ to describe how the brain ________.

A  controls some actions more than others

B  organizes how different tasks are carried out

C  distinguishes between easier and harder tasks

4   What do we learn about the experiment?

A  The researchers knew that some of the subjects had done similar tasks before.          B  Not all of the subjects did the same tasks.

C  The subjects started with simple tasks and move on to more complicated ones.

5   Which of the following happened during the experiment?

A  Sometimes little time was lost moving from one task to another.

B  Some subjects always found it hard to move from one task to another.

C  Complex tasks presented more problems than unfamiliar tasks.

6   One of the two stages of the brain’s executive control ________.

A  leads to a major disadvantage of multitasking

B  takes longer for some people than for others

C  has no connection with multitasking

7   One of the implications of the research is that ________.

A  some people are not suited to multitasking

B  multitasking always results in less efficiency

C  a common attitude to multitasking is wrong

8   The researchers believe that their research might ________.

A  encourage people not to do multitasking in some situations

B  affect the way that people approach multitasking

C  result in technology replacing people for certain tasks

9   In the final paragraph, the writer says that multitasking is something that ________.

A  is likely to increase in the future

B  people in authority have paid too little attention to

C  is relevant in many areas of life

10   What is the main topic of the text?

A  The growth of multitasking

B  How complicated the brain’s processes for multitasking are

C  The relationship between multitasking and efficiency

Reading total 10

SPEAKING

Student A

1   Ask your partner these questions.

1   What’s your favourite memory of your childhood?

2   What can you remember about the teachers you had when you were a child?

3   Which modern gadget is the most useful one for you?

4   What kind of multitasking do you do?

5   When have you taken revenge on someone?

2   Now answer your partner’s questions.

3   Now talk about one of these statements, saying if you agree or disagree. Give reasons.

1   ‘Children today have too much freedom.’

2   ‘Technology has had a bad effect on communication between people.’

3   ‘There is never a good way of ending a relationship.’

4   Now listen to your partner. Do you agree with him/ her?

Speaking total 15

Student B

1   Answer your partner’s questions.

2   Now ask your partner these questions.

1   What games did you like playing when you were a child?

2   What did you dislike doing when you were a child?

3   Which modern gadget do you think wastes people’s time?

4   How do you communicate most with friends and family?

5   What causes teenagers’ relationships to break up?

3   Listen to your partner. Do you agree with him/ her?

4   Now talk about one of these statements, saying if you agree or disagree. Give reasons.

1   ‘Childhood is the most important part of everyone’s life.’

2   ‘It is better to be very busy than not busy at all.’

3   ‘Revenge is never a good thing.’

Speaking total 15

KEY

Grammar, Vocabulary, and Pronunciation

GRAMMAR

1 1   was driving

2   ’d / had been working

3   decided

4   is expected

5   is said

6   to be

2 1   getting

2   gets worse

3   get used

4   got caught

5   to get

6   to give

3 1   used

2   going

3   complain

4   It appears

5   seem

6   According

7   may have

8   understood to

Vocabulary

4 1   outlook

2   wonder

3   engrossed

4   neighbourhood

5   post

6   ridiculed

7   fear

8   match

5 1   a long-term relationship

2   a time-saving gadget

3   a hard time

4   the time of your life

5   some time off

6   a question of time

6 1   whole

2   together

3   off

4   stick

5   around

6   out

Pronunciation

7 1   gadget

2   friendship

3   believe, peak

4   rite

8 1   boredom

2   overcome

3   crowning

4   partnership

5   revenge

Reading and Writing

Reading

1   C

2   C

3   B

4   A

5   A

6   A

7   C

8   B

9   C

10   C

A STUDY OF MULTITASKING

(1) Technology increasingly makes it possible for people to do more than one task at a time, for example moving between browsing the Web and using other computer programs, talking on mobile phones while driving, or flying a jet and monitoring air traffic. Indeed, the word describing this – ‘multitasking’ – has gone from being invented to being commonly used in everyday life in a remarkably short time. (2) A recent study has looked at whether multitasking is purely beneficial or has its downside, especially when the tasks being done together are complicated ones.

The researchers concluded that when people are multitasking, they are using what they call (3) ‘executive control’ processes. These processes concern different parts of the brain and involve the brain allocating different mental resources to different tasks and deciding which tasks are more important than others. The brain’s executive control gives the appropriate resources to the different aspects of tasks, such as understanding what the task requires, thinking about what to do, and taking action.

The researchers conducted an experiment into how much time was lost when people repeatedly switched between two tasks. (4) The tasks varied in terms of how complex they were and how familiar the subjects were with doing those tasks, and they included such things as solving mathematical problems and classifying geometric objects. The researchers measured how long it took the subjects to carry out the tasks and considered the speed in connection with whether the tasks were familiar or unfamiliar, and whether the rules for doing them were simple or complicated.
The results of the experiments were the same for every kind of task. In each case, the subjects lost time when they moved from one task to another, and the amount of time they lost increased when the tasks were complex or unfamiliar. (5) When they were familiar with a task, they were able to adapt to changing to it and get on with it much more quickly. The researchers say that these results indicate that the brain’s executive control consists of two separate stages. They called the first stage ‘goal shifting’, meaning a preference to do one of the tasks rather than the other at a particular moment. The second stage they named ‘rule activation’, meaning moving from engaging with the rules associated with how to go about one task to engaging with the rules involved in doing the other task. (6) The second stage, rule activation, takes a significant amount of time, and this delay multiplies when people keep switching between tasks. The result is that quite a lot of time is lost when multitasking, in comparison with the time that would be taken if each task was completed separately.

(7) This has major implications for multitasking, suggesting that although people may think that it saves time without affecting efficiency, in reality it actually takes more time, and this may have an adverse effect on efficiency. In the case of someone using a mobile phone while driving, multitasking could mean that they are not in full control of their vehicle during the short period when they are switching to using the phone.

(8) The researchers feel that their research has important consequences for multitasking. Their conclusions regarding executive control and how it works may, they believe, help people to look for strategies that will enable them to operate in the most efficient way possible when they are multitasking. And an understanding of executive mental control could have an impact on the design of the technology involved in such areas as operating aircraft and air traffic control, as well as other activities where the interface between humans and computers is crucial to efficiency.

In addition, there are other possible applications of this research. Understanding how people function while (9) multitasking could assist with recruitment, training and assessment of personnel in the workplace. It could also have an influence on government and industrial regulations, assist in the diagnosis and treatment of brain-damaged patients, and increase our general understanding of how the brain works.

Writing

Student’s own answers.

Task completion: The task is fully completed and the answer easy to understand.
(4 marks)

Grammar: The student uses appropriate structures to achieve the task. Minor errors do not obscure the meaning. (3 marks)

Vocabulary: The student uses a sufficient range of words and phrases to communicate the message clearly. (3 marks)

Listening and Speaking

Listening

1 1   G

2   A

3   C

4   E

5   H

2 1   the future

2   shock and disbelief

3   ‘what if’

4   anger and panic

5   ups and downs

Speaking

Interactive communication and oral production: The student communicates effectively with his / her partner, asking and answering simple questions, and where necessary initiating conversation, and responding. The student uses appropriate strategies to complete the task successfully. (10 marks)

Grammar and Vocabulary: The student uses a sufficient range of vocabulary and structure to communicate clearly. Minor occasional errors do not impede communication. (5 marks)

Pronunciation: The student’s intonation, stress, and articulation of sounds make the message clear and comprehensible. (5 marks)

Advertisements

Responses

  1. Hi, where I can find the listening of this quicktest unit 2?

    Like


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: