Posted by: crisdiaz24 | May 17, 2011

TEST UNIT 6

GRAMMAR

1   Underline the correct word(s).

Example:    My bus to leave / leaves in five minutes.

1   The team is due to / due arrive at six o’clock.

2   Bob’s will go / going to New York next week.

3   Will / Are we be meeting outside the cinema?

4   I’m about going / to go to the shops. Do we need more milk?

5   We ’re move / move into our new flat next month.

6   You’re going getting / to get a new car next year, aren’t you?

6

2   Complete the sentences with one word.

Example:    I think he had a good time even though he didn’t say so.

1   She went to Paris ________ didn’t see the Eiffel Tower.

2   A  Did you go to the party?

B  No, but Joanne ________. She said it was a lot of fun.

3   I felt really sad when ________ realized that Minoo had left without saying goodbye.

4   You didn’t help make dinner last night, but you really should ________.

5   A  Are you going to the office picnic tomorrow?

     B  I suppose ________, unless it rains.

6   A  Did Lo Chi get the job she wanted?

     B  I’m afraid ________. They offered it to someone else.

7   The kids wanted to go to the lake, but I told them not ________. It’s too far.

8   Brett said I would enjoy the concert, but I don’t think I ________. I’ve never liked jazz, so I’d probably be bored.

8

3   Order the words to make emphatic sentences.

Example: much / it / so / was / cost / taxi / the / that

It was the taxi that cost so much.

1   happy / be / to / is / want / I / all

2   happened / that / was / late / he / what / was

3   I / a / what / need / holiday / is

4   was / I / bored / because / left / is / the / why / I / reason

5   her / it / saw / was / I / when / month / last

6   place / we /was / a / the / where / met / café

6
Grammar total 20

VOCABULARY

4   Underline the odd word(s) out.

Example:    day trip   touristy   city break   guided tour

1   trait   grumpy   fussy   serene

2   a nest   a hive   a horse   a tank

3   dog   bark   kennel   lunatic

4   roar   grunt   stable   squeak

5   breathtaking   dull   spoilt   overcrowded

6   delay   postpone   cancel   put off

6

5   Complete the words in the sentences.

Example:    We went on a package holiday to Greece last year.

1   If you go on a l________-haul flight, you should stretch and get up and move around as often as possible.

2   Don’t forget to t________ out travel insurance before you set off.

3   I really like to get off the beaten t________ when I go on holiday.

4   Instead of a nose and mouth, a bird has a sharp b________.

5   The blue whale, the giant panda, and the snow leopard are all endangered s________.

6   Some animals can be bred in c________, for example in zoos.

7   If you have a problem at work, you’ve got to take the b________ by the horns and sort it out before it gets worse.

8   Juan made a real p_______ of himself at dinner. He even ordered two desserts!

8

6   Underline the correct word(s).

Example:    Given the choice / choose I’d take the train rather than the bus.

1   When I was in Vietnam, I enjoyed meeting other backpackers / backpacks and sharing stories and information.

2   Getting a job in Japan was a bit of dream / a fluke, but it made me very happy.

3   Thailand is pretty crowded these days, but Cambodia hasn’t gone too far / walked down that road yet.

4   Traditional Chinese wisdom says you should obey / pursue and honour your parents.

5   When we visited New York, we stayed in a suit / suite in an expensive hotel in Manhattan.

6   Try to lie / lay down and go to sleep. We have a really busy day tomorrow.

6
Vocabulary total 20

PRONUNCIATION

7   Match the words with the same sound.

picturesque   deny   currently  neigh   biased   donkey

Example:    fish picturesque

1   besides ________, ________

2   charity ________, ________

3   cage ________

5

8   Underline the stressed syllable.

Example:    lively

1   insurance

2   pursue

3   definitely

4   tolerant

5   eccentric

5
Pronunciation total 10
Grammar, Vocabulary, and Pronunciation total 50

READING

Read the article and tick  A, B, or C.

LEARNING ABOUT ANIMALS AT SCHOOL

How do children learn about wildlife? And is what they learn the sort of thing they should be learning? It is my belief that children should not just be acquiring knowledge of animals but also developing attitudes and feelings towards them based on exposure to the real lives of animals in their natural habitats. But is this happening?

Some research in this area indicates that it is not. Learning about animals in school is often completely disconnected from the real lives of real animals, with the result that children often end up with little or no understanding or lasting knowledge of them. They learn factual information about animals, aimed at enabling them to identify them and have various abstract ideas about them, but that is the extent of their learning. Children’s storybooks tend to personify animals as characters rather than teach about them.

For direct contact with wild and international animals, the only opportunity most children have is visiting a zoo. The educational benefit of this for children is often given as the main reason for doing it but research has shown that zoo visits seldom add to children’s knowledge of animals – the animals are simply like exhibits in a museum that the children look at without engaging with them as living creatures. Children who belong to wildlife or environmental organizations or who watch wildlife TV programmes, however, show significantly higher knowledge than any other group of children studied in research. The studies show that if children learn about animals in their natural habitats, particularly through wildlife-based activities, they know more about them than they do as a result of visiting zoos or learning about them in the classroom.

Research has also been done into the attitudes of children towards animals. It shows that in general terms, children form strong attachments to individual animals, usually their pets, but do not have strong feelings for animals in general. This attitude is the norm regardless of the amount or kind of learning about animals they have at school. However, those children who watch television wildlife programmes show an interest in and affection for wildlife in its natural environment, and their regard for animals in general is higher.

However, there is evidence that all of this is changing, and changing fast. The advent of the computer and interactive multimedia instruction in schools is changing the way that children learn about and perceive animals. The inclusion of pictures and audio enables children to look at and hear an animal at the same time. There is evidence that children recall more when they have learnt about animals in this way, and furthermore this is the case whether the animal is one they were previously familiar or unfamiliar with.

Interactive multimedia instruction has opened up a whole new world of learning about animals. It has made it possible to educate children about wildlife beyond simple facts and to inspire in children an understanding of their real lives and affection and respect for them. This is particularly important in modern urban life, where children’s only direct experience of animals is likely to be with domestic pets. Without first-hand experiences of wildlife, children need other ways of gaining an appreciation of and respect for animals. Previously, only the minority of children who belonged to wildlife organizations or watched TV wildlife programmes developed this attitude. Now, computer technology is transforming the way children gain knowledge of wildlife. Games, stories, audio recordings, photographs, movies and spoken narration all combine in multimedia form to present animals as real living creatures, as well as providing factual information about them.

In this way, children can appreciate the unique qualities of different animals and engage with wildlife in a more personal way than in the past. This is important, because what happens to the world’s wildlife will depend to at least some extent on the attitudes towards animals that people acquire as children. If they learn about them as real, living creatures in their natural habitats, they are more likely to have respect for them and to be concerned about their treatment when they are older.

1   What issue does the writer raise in the first paragraph?

A  The outcome of what children learn about animals

B  The amount of learning about animals that children do

C  The level of interest that children have in learning about animals

2   What opinion does the writer express in the second paragraph?

A  Children’s learning about animals at school has the wrong emphasis.

B  What children learn about animals at school is often inaccurate.

C  Children’s storybooks are an effective way of teaching them about animals.

3   What does the writer say about zoo visits?

A  Children don’t enjoy them as much as adults think they do.

B  They have less educational benefit than they are believed to have.

C  They can be upsetting for some children.

4   What does the writer say about learning about animals in their natural habitats?

A  It is very difficult for most children to do this.

B  It teaches children more about animals than other methods.

C  It requires a lot of effort from children.

5   Research shows that children’s attitudes to animals ________.

A  differ from what adults might expect them to be

B  depend on whether or not they have pets

C  are not affected by what they learn about them at school

6   The writer says that the use of interactive multimedia instruction ________.

A  is most effective for teaching about animals children know nothing about

B  increases the amount that children can remember after lessons

C  works better for some children than for others

7   The writer says that in modern urban life, interactive multimedia instruction ________.

A  is a good substitute for direct contact with wildlife

B  is particularly effective for children who do not have pets

C  can relate the lives of animals to children’s own lives

8   What does the writer say about children who watch TV wildlife programmes?

A  They are very keen on interactive multimedia instruction about animals.          B  They no longer know more about animals than other children.          C  There are now more of them because of interactive multimedia instruction.

9   The writer says in the last paragraph that what children learn about animals at school ________.

A  has an effect on how their personalities develop

B  may change as they get older

C  will have some effect on attitudes to wildlife in the future

10   The writer’s main point in the text as a whole is that ________.

A  children should learn about how animals really live

B  children enjoy learning about animals with interactive multimedia instruction          C  some children are much more interested in animals than others

Reading total 10

WRITING

Choose one of the essay titles below and write approximately 250 words:

1   A lot of computer games are addictive and violent. As a result the minimum age for most games should be 18.

2   To reduce the number of accidents on the roads anyone using their mobile whilst driving should be arrested.

3   To help reduce CO2 emissions people should only be allowed to fly once or twice a year.

Grammar, Vocabulary, and Pronunciation

KEY

GRAMMAR

1   1   is due to

2   going

3   Will

4   to go

5   move

6   to get

2   1   but

2   did

3   I

4   have

5   so

6   not

7   to

8   would

3   1   All I want is to be happy.

2   What happened was that he was late.

3   What I need is a holiday.

4   The reason why I left is because I was bored.

5   It was last month when I saw her.

6   The place where we met was a café.

Vocabulary

4   1   trait

2   a horse

3   lunatic

4   stable

5   breathtaking

6   cancel

5   1   long

2   take

3   track

4   beak

5   species

6   captivity

7   bull

8   pig

6   1   backpackers

2   a fluke

3   gone too far

4   obey

5   suite

6   lie

Pronunciation

7   1   deny, biased

2   currently, donkey

3   neigh

8   1   insurance

2   pursue

3   definitely

4   tolerant

5   eccentric

Reading and Writing

Reading

     1   A

2   A

3   B

4   B

5   C

6   B

7   A

8   B

9   C

10   A

LEARNING ABOUT ANIMALS AT SCHOOL

How do children learn about wildlife? And is what they learn the sort of thing they should be learning? (1) It is my belief that children should not just be acquiring knowledge of animals but also developing attitudes and feelings towards them based on exposure to the real lives of animals in their natural habitats. But is this happening?

Some research in this area indicates that it is not. (2) Learning about animals in school is often completely disconnected from the real lives of real animals, with the result that children often end up with little or no understanding or lasting knowledge of them. They learn factual information about animals, aimed at enabling them to identify them and have various abstract ideas about them, but that is the extent of their learning. Children’s storybooks tend to personify animals as characters rather than teach about them.

For direct contact with wild and international animals, the only opportunity most children have is (3) visiting a zoo. The educational benefit of this for children is often given as the main reason for doing it but research has shown that zoo visits seldom add to children’s knowledge of animals – the animals are simply like exhibits in a museum that the children look at without engaging with them as living creatures. Children who belong to wildlife or environmental organizations or who watch wildlife TV programmes, however, show significantly higher knowledge than any other group of children studied in research. The studies show that (4) if children learn about animals in their natural habitats, particularly through wildlife-based activities, they know more about them than they do as a result of visiting zoos or learning about them in the classroom.

Research has also been done into the attitudes of children towards animals. It shows that in general terms, children form strong attachments to individual animals, usually their pets, but do not have strong feelings for animals in general. (5) This attitude is the norm regardless of the amount or kind of learning about animals they have at school. However, those children who watch television wildlife programmes show an interest in and affection for wildlife in its natural environment, and their regard for animals in general is higher.

However, there is evidence that all of this is changing, and changing fast. The advent of the computer and interactive multimedia instruction in schools is changing the way that children learn about and perceive animals. The inclusion of pictures and audio enables children to look at and hear an animal at the same time. (6) There is evidence that children recall more when they have learnt about animals in this way, and furthermore this is the case whether the animal is one they were previously familiar or unfamiliar with.

(7) Interactive multimedia instruction has opened up a whole new world of learning about animals. It has made it possible to educate children about wildlife beyond simple facts and to inspire in children an understanding of their real lives and affection and respect for them. This is particularly important in modern urban life, where children’s only direct experience of animals is likely to be with domestic pets. Without first-hand experiences of wildlife, children need other ways of gaining an appreciation of and respect for animals. (8) Previously, only the minority of children who belonged to wildlife organizations or watched TV wildlife programmes developed this attitude. Now, computer technology is transforming the way children gain knowledge of wildlife. Games, stories, audio recordings, photographs, movies and spoken narration all combine in multimedia form to present animals as real living creatures, as well as providing factual information about them.

In this way, children can appreciate the unique qualities of different animals and engage with wildlife in a more personal way than in the past. This is important, because (9) what happens to the world’s wildlife will depend to at least some extent on the attitudes towards animals that people acquire as children. If they learn about them as real, living creatures in their natural habitats, they are more likely to have respect for them and to be concerned about their treatment when they are older.

Writing

Student’s own answers.

Task completion: The task is fully completed and the answer easy to understand.
(4 marks)

Grammar: The student uses appropriate structures to achieve the task. Minor errors do not obscure the meaning. (3 marks)

Vocabulary: The student uses a sufficient range of words and phrases to communicate the message clearly. (3 marks)

Listening and Speaking

Listening

1   1   D

2   F

3   B

4   G

5   A

2   1   Immigration Station / immigration station

2   on board (ship)

3   six-second physicals / 6-second physicals

4   29 questions / twenty-nine questions

5   two per cent / 2%

Speaking

Interactive communication and oral production: The student communicates effectively with his / her partner, asking and answering simple questions, and where necessary initiating conversation, and responding. The student uses appropriate strategies to complete the task successfully. (10 marks)

Grammar and Vocabulary: The student uses a sufficient range of vocabulary and structure to communicate clearly. Minor occasional errors do not impede communication. (5 marks)

Pronunciation: The student’s intonation, stress, and articulation of sounds make the message clear and comprehensible. (5 marks)

  
      
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Responses

  1. Can you send me the key, please.

    Like

  2. Is it a New English File advanced?

    Like

    • Yes, it is.

      Like


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