Posted by: crisdiaz24 | May 30, 2011

TEST UNIT 7

GRAMMAR

1   Order the words to make questions and sentences.

Example: joys / the / many / are / language / a learning / of / .

The joys of learning a language are many.

1   my / I / used / motorcycle / brother’s / .

2   Anita’s / I / to / went / a / at / party / .

3   remember / you / can / price / the / car / of / the / ?

4   of / I’m / father’s / friend / a / your / .

5   is / my / an / English / cousin / teacher / .

6   pot / that / you / see / can / flower / ?

7   director / Nikolai / a / is / company / .

8   hotel / most / Budapest’s / is / this / famous / .

 

  8

2   Complete the sentences with such or so.

Example:    It was so rainy that we decided not to go camping.

1   Guillermo and Susan are ________ nice people.

2   There was ________ much traffic, we were late.

3   Your brother is ________ handsome!

4   I’ve got ________ a lot of work to do this weekend.

5   He’s ________ a good guitar player that he got a record deal when he was 17.

6   ________ lucky was Tim that he won the lottery twice.

 

 

  6

3   Underline the correct word(s).

Example: The faster / more fast I work, the sooner I finish.

1   John is nearly the tallest / taller child in his class.

2   A  When should we leave for Rome?

     B  The soonest / sooner the better.

3   We’ve only got a few / many more hours before we go.

4   He’s got much / more and more experience than me.

5   You just as clever than / as your brother, aren’t you?

6   The presentation was three times as long / longer as it was supposed to be.

 

 

 

  6

 

Grammar total   20

VOCABULARY

4   Complete the words in the sentences.

Example:    A light dish served at the beginning of a meal is called a starter.

1   For d________, I’d like to have chocolate cake and ice cream, please.

2   I eat almost everything except for s________. Fish and mussels and so on make me feel ill.

3   Dan is a real f________. He’s always eating at the best restaurants, and he cooks delicious food at home, too.

4   I don’t really enjoy e________ food with fancy sauces and hundreds of ingredients. I think the best food is basic, with a nice, simple flavour.

5   Ever since I started my weekly w________ at the gym last month, I feel so much better.

6   Doing yoga really improved my f________. My back and legs used to be very stiff, but now they’re really bendy!

7   I think you need a good sense of h________ to be a successful manager. You have to be able to laugh at yourself.

8   Tim’s joke was so h________ that we couldn’t stop laughing all afternoon.

 

  8

5   Underline the correct word.

Example: One of his great strongs / strengths / strongnesses is his patience.

1   You need really ripe / weak / chopped fruit to make the best baked figs.

2   If you don’t know how deep / high / short the water is, you should never, ever jump or dive in.

3   Your abdominal muscles support your weakness / trunk / stretch.

4   Frying / Scrambled / Melted eggs are my favourite breakfast food.

5   We need to measure the thick / thickth / thickness of the new carpet and cut a bit off the bottom of the door.

6   Could you stir / stuff / peel this sauce for about five minutes while I chop the onions?

 

 

  6

6   Underline the odd word(s) out.

Example: hip   calf   sit-up   spine

1   a baking tray   a chopping board   a toasted sandwich   a saucepan

2   puns   wordplay   cartoonist   black humour

3   steam   boil   roast   simmer

4   a physiotherapist   a comedian   a chef   a stride

5   steamed mussels   peeled shrimps   grated cheese   shellfish

6   witty   amusing   ripe   funny

  6

 

Vocabulary total   20

PRONUNCIATION

7   Match the words with the same sound.

chopped   grated   scrambled   whipped   grilled   steamed

Example:    melted grated

1   baked ________, ________

2   boiled ________, ________, ________

 

  5

8   Underline the stressed syllable.

Example:    microwave

1   amusing

2   cartoon

3   basil

4   weakness

5   surreal

 

  5

 

Pronunciation total   10

 

 

Grammar, Vocabulary, and Pronunciation total   50

 

 

 

READING

Read the article and tick A, B, or C.

WHAT SPORT TEACHES CHILDREN

Many parents think that their children can learn a lot about good values and behaviour through sport. And it is certainly true that sport can teach children about such things as teamwork, complying with the rules of how something is done, fair play, and decency towards others. However, they also find that these good values are often contradicted when children watch sports on TV. Professional sports people and coaches sometimes don’t exhibit the standards of behaviour and fair play that parents hope their children will learn and show when they are playing sports, and indeed in all other areas of life. While watching sports on TV, the chances are that children will see professional players cheating, having tantrums, fighting, or abusing officials such as referees. In addition, it is highly likely that children will be aware of well-known cases of sports people being caught using drugs to improve their performance.

The danger of all this is that it could give children the idea that winning is all that counts and that the key point about sport is that you should win at all costs. Good behaviour and fair play aren’t the message that comes across. Instead, it looks as if cheating and bad behaviour are perfectly reasonable ways of getting what you want. This message is reinforced by the fact that some of these sports people acquire enormous fame and wealth, making it seem that they are being handsomely rewarded either despite or because of their bad behaviour.

What can parents do about this? Well, they can regard sport on television as a good opportunity to discuss attitudes and behaviour with their children, both in sport and in life in general. They can sit down and watch the sport with the child. If the child likes a particular team or player, find out what it is about that team or player that appeals to the child. If you see a player swearing at the referee, get the child’s opinion on that behaviour. Discuss whether that player’s skill is more important than their behaviour. Ask what the child thinks the player’s contribution to the team is – how should the player be behaving in that situation, is the player displaying a good attitude towards teamwork? Point out that no player can win a team game on their own, and that it’s important for team members to work well together.

Another thing to focus on is what the commentators say. Do they frown on bad behaviour from players, think it’s quite amusing or even seem to think it’s a positively good thing? What do the officials do about bad behaviour? If they seem to let players get away with it, parents can discuss with children whether this is right or not and what effect it has on the game. If they punish a player, perhaps by sending him off, parents can discuss with children the consequences of bad behaviour, both for that player and his teammates. And look too at the reactions of coaches and managers. Do they accept losing with good grace or scowl and show a bad attitude to it? Parents can use this to discuss attitudes to winning and losing and to remind children that both are part of sport – nobody can win all the time.

However, what children can learn from watching sports is by no means all about the negatives and parents should make sure they accentuate the positives too. They should emphasize to children the high reputation that well-behaved players have, not just with their teammates but also with spectators and the media. They can focus on the contribution made by such players during a game, discussing how valuable they are in the team. The message from this is that you can be the best possible player without any kind of bad behaviour. In the interviews after a game, they can point out to a child that the well-behaved players don’t gloat when they win or sulk when they lose. Parents can draw attention to well-behaved sports people who achieve great fame and wealth, showing that a good attitude can lead to enormous success. And they can draw attention to how well these people conduct themselves in their personal lives and the good work they do for others when they are not playing. In other words, parents should get their children to focus on the positive role models, rather than the antics of the badly behaved but often more publicized players.

1   In the first paragraph, the writer contrasts ________.

A  what sports people say about sport with how they behave

B  what parents think about sport with what children think about it

C  what children learn about sport with what they see

2   What does the writer say about the bad behaviour of professional sports people?

A  They are unaware of its effect on children.

B  It can take many different forms.

C  Children don’t like seeing or hearing about it.

3   The writer says that children can be given the message that ________.

A  bad behaviour can be regarded as a good thing

B  you are only going to win if you behave badly

C  cheating at sport is often not noticed

4   The writer says that parents watching sport on TV with their children should ________.

A  point out behaviour they disapprove of

B  find out their children’s views on what they see

C  correct things that the children say about behaviour

5   Which of the following should parents discuss with children?

A  The idea that teamwork is more important than individual skill

B  The reason why a team with a badly behaved player lost a game

C  Why a team member is behaving badly

6   What does the writer say about commentators and officials?

A  Their reaction to bad behaviour is often unclear.

B  Their words and actions have a particularly significant effect on children.

C  They don’t always show that they disapprove of bad behaviour.

7   After watching the reactions of managers and coaches, parents should point out that ________.

A  someone loses every game          B  bad behaviour can cause a team to lose

C  your reaction to losing is more important than your attitude when you win

8   What does the writer mean by ‘accentuate the positives’?

A  Emphasize that most sports people behave well

B  Focus on the benefits of good behaviour

C  Stress that children’s opinions are right

9   The writer says that parents should draw attention to the connection between ________.

A  how players behave and the amount of publicity they get

B  how players behave and how often they win

C  how players behave and what they do when they aren’t playing

10   Which of the following best summarizes the writer’s view in the article as a whole?

A  The way that sport is covered on TV should change.

B  Both good and bad behaviour in sport can teach children valuable lessons.

C  Children should not be encouraged to connect sport with fame and wealth.

 

KEY

 

Grammar, Vocabulary, and Pronunciation

GRAMMAR

1   1   I used my brother’s motorcycle.

2   I went to a party at Anita’s.

3   Can you remember the price of the car?

4   I’m a friend of your father’s.

5   My cousin is an English teacher.

6   Can you see that flower pot?

7   Nikolai is a company director.

8   This is Budapest’s most famous hotel.

2   1   such

2   so

3   so

4   such

5   such

6   So

3   1   tallest

2   sooner

3   a few

4   much

5   as

6   as long

Vocabulary

4   1   dessert

2   seafood

3   foodie

4   elaborate

5   workout

6   flexibility

7   humour

8   hilarious

5   1   ripe

2   deep

3   trunk

4   Scrambled

5   thickness

6   stir

6   1   a toasted sandwich

2   cartoonist

3   roast

4   a stride

5   grated cheese

6   ripe

Pronunciation

7   1   chopped, whipped

2   scrambled, grilled, steamed

8   1   amusing

2   cartoon

3   basil

4   weakness

5   surreal

Reading and Writing

Reading

     1   C

2   B

3   A

4   B

5   A

6   C

7   A

8   B

9   C

10   B

WHAT SPORT TEACHES CHILDREN

Many parents think that their (1) children can learn a lot about good values and behaviour through sport. And it is certainly true that sport can teach children about such things as teamwork, complying with the rules of how something is done, fair play, and decency towards others. However, they also find that these good values are often contradicted when children watch sports on TV. Professional sports people and coaches sometimes don’t exhibit the standards of behaviour and fair play that parents hope their children will learn and show when they are playing sports, and indeed in all other areas of life. While watching sports on TV, the chances are that children will see professional players (2) cheating, having tantrums, fighting, or abusing officials such as referees. In addition, it is highly likely that children will be aware of well-known cases of sports people being caught using drugs to improve their performance.

The danger of all this is that it could give children the idea that winning is all that counts and that the key point about sport is that you should win at all costs. Good behaviour and fair play aren’t the message that comes across. Instead, (3) it looks as if cheating and bad behaviour are perfectly reasonable ways of getting what you want. This message is reinforced by the fact that some of these sports people acquire enormous fame and wealth, making it seem that they are being handsomely rewarded either despite or because of their bad behaviour.

What can parents do about this? Well, they can regard sport on television as a good opportunity to discuss attitudes and behaviour with their children, both in sport and in life in general. They can sit down and (4) watch the sport with the child. If the child likes a particular team or player, find out what it is about that team or player that appeals to the child. If you see a player swearing at the referee, get the child’s opinion on that behaviour. Discuss whether that player’s skill is more important than their behaviour. Ask what the child thinks the player’s contribution to the team is – how should the player be behaving in that situation, is the player displaying a good attitude towards teamwork? (5) Point out that no player can win a team game on their own, and that it’s important for team members to work well together.

Another thing to focus on is what the commentators say. (6) Do they frown on bad behaviour from players, think it’s quite amusing or even seem to think it’s a positively good thing? What do the officials do about bad behaviour? If they seem to let players get away with it, parents can discuss with children whether this is right or not and what effect it has on the game. If they punish a player, perhaps by sending him off, parents can discuss with children the consequences of bad behaviour, both for that player and his teammates. And look too at the reactions of coaches and managers. Do they accept losing with good grace or scowl and show a bad attitude to it? Parents can use this to discuss attitudes to winning and losing and to (7) remind children that both are part of sport – nobody can win all the time.

However, what children can learn from watching sports is by no means all about the negatives and parents should make sure they accentuate the positives too. (8) They should emphasize to children the high reputation that well-behaved players have, not just with their teammates but also with spectators and the media. They can focus on the contribution made by such players during a game, discussing how valuable they are in the team. The message from this is that you can be the best possible player without any kind of bad behaviour. In the interviews after a game, they can point out to a child that the (9) well-behaved players don’t gloat when they win or sulk when they lose. Parents can draw attention to well-behaved sports people who achieve great fame and wealth, showing that a good attitude can lead to enormous success. And they can draw attention to how well these people conduct themselves in their personal lives and the good work they do for others when they are not playing. In other words, parents should get their children to focus on the positive role models, rather than the antics of the badly behaved but often more publicized players.


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