Posted by: crisdiaz24 | October 4, 2011

TEST UNITS 4 – 7

GRAMMAR

1   Complete the sentences. Use the correct form of the verb in brackets.

Example:    We’ve arranged for the tour to be (be) finished at 9.30.

1   Sheila advised me ________ (contact) the manufacturer. They may be able to repair the laptop.

2   I dislike people ________ (talk) while I’m giving a presentation.

3   We would hate you ________ (think) we don’t want to come to your concert.

4   Ivan’s waiting for the telephone ________ (ring). Bart said he’d call us as soon as he got some news.

5   Provided Lisa ________ (take) her phone with her when she left this morning, we should be able to send her a text message.

6   We would ________ (wait) to start eating, but we didn’t know you were coming.

7   If you ________ (have) a bit more money to spend, you could buy a bigger TV.

8   We ________ (not hear) Franco’s band play tomorrow night if we don’t get tickets.

9   By next Friday I hope ________ (have) finished this project and started something new.

10   It’s no use ________ (ask) Barry to help this weekend. He’s going to be away until Monday.

11   He’s tired of ________ (be) given presents he can’t use. He says he’d rather have money.

12   Would you rather ________ (give) me the blue hat and kept the red one for yourself? We can trade, if you’d like to.

12

2   Underline the correct word(s).

Example:    You ought / should to save some money for your holiday.

1   We won’t be allowed / able to use the computers in the library without showing our ID.

2   You needn’t have / needn’t gone to the trouble of cooking, but thank you so much.

3   Are / Will you be having dinner with us tonight?

4   You ’re start / start your university course next month, right?

5   The place / What you need is a good meal and a night’s sleep.

6   What happened / The reason happened was he lost his keys.

7   All / Everything we want is a comfortable hotel by the beach.

8   We became much / more and more relaxed the longer we stayed.

9   Saturday was by far / much the happiest day of my life.

10   We studied together at Tom’s / the house of Tom.

11   When I finish my degree, I want to train to be a maths / maths’ teacher.

12   Aren’t you a friend of my brother / brother’s?

12

3   Complete the sentences with the correct word(s).

Example: Why don’t we go home now? After all, we got here at seven o’clock this morning.

At least   After all   Otherwise

1   A  Do you know anything about police work?

     B  Yes. As ________ of fact, my sister is a police officer.

beside   incidentally   a matter

2   On ________ hand, I’d like to go out tonight. On the other hand, I have a lot of homework to do.

the one   the other   another

3   ________ we’ve arrived too late because the boat has already left.

As far as   Obviously   It’s concerned

4   We didn’t have enough time to go camping last weekend. ________, the weather was really rainy.

Talking of   Anyway   In other words

5   Tony ________ been at work all night. The report is finished and the conference room is set up for the presentation.

’s as though   seems   seems to have

6   It ________ as though Julie was going to win the race, but she fell near the end.

seemed   seems   was seeming

7   He ________ like his uncle George.

has the look   looks   does the look of

8   I ________ cold first thing this morning, but I feel warm now that the sun is up.

feel   was felt   felt

9   A  Did Grace get a place at Oxford University?

     B  I’m afraid ________. But she’s been offered one at Durham.

no   didn’t   not

10   Dave probably enjoyed the party, but he didn’t say ________.

so   did   he enjoyed

11   He went to the shop ________ didn’t think to buy milk.

he   but   that

12   A  You must try the potato salad. It’s delicious!

       B  I already ________, but I didn’t like it.

have   tried   did it

13   Steve is ________ happy in his new job!

as much   so   much

14   My parents are ________ good gardeners.

such   as   more

15   We had ________ for lunch we didn’t have any dinner.

as little   so much   nearly

16   You’ve got ________ to do to get ready for your trip.

such a lot   so far   many

6

16
Grammar total 40

VOCABULARY

4   Underline the odd word(s) out.

Example:    sword   cannon   survivor   spear

1   civil war   loot   capture   shell

2   anxious   compulsive   edgy   premiere

3   over   along   above   on top of

4   a plaster   a blister   a bandage   stitches

5   acupuncture   hypnotherapy   reflexology   osteopath

6   dull   spoilt   picturesque   overcrowded

7   bite   sting   fur   scratch

8   figs   mussels   shrimps   shellfish

9   hips   calf   spine   stride

10   slapstick   irony   puns   laugh

10

5   Underline the correct word(s).

Example:    Wallace’s army was hopelessly outnumbered / coup.

1   The victorious / wounded soldiers were taken to hospital for treatment.

2   I prefer to go to the cinema and see films on the television / big screen.

3   My first car was a second-hand / duty-free sports car I bought from my neighbour.

4   When the weather is warm, I love to wind / pull down the car windows and feel the wind in my hair.

5   I thought the film was underestimated / overrated. All the reviews said it was brilliant, but I thought it was boring.

6   I feel grumpy / serene when I first wake up in the morning. I don’t like to talk to anyone until I’ve had a cup of coffee, because I might say something rude.

7   There are some horses living in a stable / hive near my house.

8   The neighbours finally reached a commitment / compromise on how to share the public park near their houses.

9   I’ve got a bowl of ripe / scrambled fruit. Would you like something? An apple? A banana?

10   They’re going to width / widen the road through the village.

10

6   Complete the sentences with one word.

Example:    The explosion blew up two buildings.

1   The two countries signed a ________ to end the war. The agreement led to peace in the region.

2   Many soldiers died because the enemy ________ was very well hidden and he was shooting at them.

3   I love coffee with whipped cream on ________.

4   Bill has gone ________ the doctor’s, but we expect him to be back at about three o’clock.

5   I watched as the little boy poured milk carefully ________ his cup. He didn’t spill a drop!

6   It seems a shame to ________ short your holiday, but if you’re not having a good time, you should go home.

7   When Tim started complaining about the food I’d made, it was the last ________. I asked him to leave and never come back.

8   Let’s drop the car off to be repaired and then walk to the supermarket. We can kill two ________ with one stone.

9   You make ________ eggs by beating the eggs and then cooking them in a pan. You need to keep stirring them.

10   When we saw Hilary dressed as a clown, we all burst out ______.

10

7 Complete the words in the sentences.

Example:    The natives used to hunt with bows and arrows.

1   The female l________ in the film was great. She was in almost every scene, and she made the character seem very real.

2   I thought the p________ of the film was kind of confusing. I didn’t understand why everyone was trying to find the man they called Waldo.

3   Would you please s________ out your cigarette? This is a no-smoking area.

4   My hair turned grey p________. I was only 25 when it happened.

5   When the pound was d________ against the euro, British people complained that their holidays in Spain were going to be more expensive.

6   When my asthma became really bad, my doctor sent me to see a s________.

7   I’d much rather go to destinations that are off the beaten t________ than to visit the popular tourist places.

8   My cat is a very f________ eater. If I don’t serve her favourite tinned food, she won’t eat.

9   I don’t mind what we do this weekend; it is e________ up to you.

10   When I was in school, I once did one hundred s________ in physical education class. My stomach muscles were very sore for about a week.

10
Vocabulary total 40

PRONUNCIATION

8   Match the words with the same sound.

joke   straw   simmer   wild   saucepan   ribs   siege   ceasefire   bark   protect   chicken

Example:    workout chicken

1   toasted _________________

2   compromise _________________

3   species _________________

4   fried _________________

5   charity _________________

6   physiotherapist _________________

7   sport _________________

8   overthrow _________________

9   baked _________________

10   past _________________

10

9   Underline the stressed syllable.

Example:    survivors

1   capture

2   defeat

3   refugee

4   antibiotics

5   stubborn

6   postpone

7   holiday

8   captivity

9   mussels

10   turkey

10
Pronunciation total 20
Grammar, Vocabulary, and Pronunciation total 100

READING

1   Read the article and tick (ü) A, B, or C.

A TRAVELLER OR A TOURIST?

A What is the difference between a traveller and a tourist? Well, the easy distinction often made concerns what kind of trip people are on. To put it simply, someone visiting other countries with a backpack and roaming from place to place without a fixed itinerary is often regarded, especially by themselves, as a ‘traveller’. Someone on holiday, especially someone on a package holiday for one or two weeks, is generally regarded as a ‘tourist’. According to this distinction, the traveller gains an understanding of the place as it really is, mixing in with the locals, learning about the culture, whereas the tourist merely skates over the surface, seeing the sights but ignoring the people and their culture. This is why many people who consider themselves ‘travellers’ sneer dismissively at ‘tourists’ and are so anxious to distance themselves from them.

B However, this distinction does not seem to me to hold water in many cases. First of all, let’s accept that a traveller is someone who fully experiences the place they visit rather than simply observing it from the outside, as a tourist does. Does everyone calling themselves a traveller really do this? Of course not. There are herds of young backpackers out there in all corners of the world who see and learn very little of the places they visit. Sticking together in groups, their tales on return are seldom of what they learnt of other cultures but of the other backpackers they met. Contact with local people is negligible, and there is the suspicion that they are merely ticking boxes so that they can say they have visited all the places that their peers go to. This seems to me not to distinguish them at all from the package tourists boasting about the places they have been to, but who the backpackers so deride. Secondly, there are plenty of people much older than the backpackers who do immerse themselves in the cultures of the places they visit, even if they are only on short holidays. It’s not about how long your stay is, how old you are, how you got there, or how you move around there. It’s all about attitude.

C If you really are a traveller, there’s a purpose to your trip beyond simply getting away from work, taking it easy or enjoying the weather. You broaden your mind, see other people’s lives through their eyes, gain new perspectives. You meet and have real conversations with local people. You learn that some of your expectations and assumptions were wrong. Your trip has an effect of you. You are wiser about another culture, other ways of thinking and living. A tourist, on the other hand, isn’t interested in any of that. Tourists hardly engage at all with the place they are visiting, preferring to confirm their own preconceptions rather than challenge them, keeping the local people and culture at arm’s length, seeing everything through the lens of a camera.

D One of the first rules of being a traveller is that you have to accept the place for what it is. Don’t complain that it’s hot, that there are bugs, that life moves at a different pace, that local people sometimes stare at you. Don’t keep comparing the place with home or other places you’ve been. Don’t let disappointments about the quality of service or level of facilities in your accommodation dominate your thoughts. Instead, get out and about. Watch how local people interact, how they go about their daily business. Learn some words of the language that you can use in shops and other places and go where the local people go. Ask questions rather than thinking you know all the answers. Once you’ve found the various bits of key information you need, leave the guidebook behind – you’ll learn more from personal contact and direct experience than you can get from any book. Put the camera away for a while and instead store images of what you see in your mind. Anyone can do these things, no matter what kind of trip they’re on. Even if you’re on a short annual holiday, you can be a traveller rather than a tourist; plenty of people who call themselves travellers are actually tourists. It’s all in the mind.

1   The writer’s intention in section A is to ________.

A  compare what ‘travellers’ and ‘tourists’ say about themselves

B  explain why it is important to distinguish between a ‘traveller’ and a ‘tourist’

C  present common definitions of ‘traveller’ and ‘tourist’

2   Which of the following does the writer describe in section A?

A  The attitude of travellers towards tourists

B  The attitude of local people towards both travellers and tourists

C  The attitude of tourists towards travellers

3   What does the writer mean by the phrase ‘hold water’ at the beginning of section B?

A  Be generally agreed          B  Be true          C  Be discussed

4   What does the writer suggest about ‘travellers’ in section B?

A  Their attitudes change during their trips.

B  They don’t really enjoy the trips they make.

C  They are not really interested in the places they visit.

5   Which of the following opinions does the writer express in section B?

A  Some people who call themselves travellers behave like tourists.          B  Some travellers have a worse attitude than some tourists.          C  Travellers and tourists should have more contact with each other.

6   What does the writer say about some older people in section B?

A  They could be considered to be ‘travellers’.

B  They dislike being referred to as ‘tourists’.

C  They disapprove of the attitude of some travellers.

7   The writer’s intention in section C is to ________.

A  encourage readers to be travellers rather than tourists

B  defend travellers against criticism

C  present his own definitions of ‘traveller’ and ‘tourist’

8   The writer compares travellers and tourists in section C in connection with ________.

A  what local people in the places they visit think of them

B  whether or not they change their views of the places they visit

C  what they tell other people about their trips when they return

9   At the beginning of section D, the writer lists things that ________.

A  travellers usually don’t notice          B  cause annoyance to local people

C  people he regards as tourists do

10   The writer’s main point in the text as a whole is that ________.

A  the kind of trip you take is less important than your attitude towards it

B  your attitude towards a trip greatly affects your enjoyment of it

C  the attitude of a traveller is no better than the attitude of a tourist

 

  10

 

2   Answer each question by putting in the correct section of the article (A–G). In which section of the article (A–G) are the following mentioned?

1   a reaction of local people when they see a visitor from another part of the world __

2   a desire to relax for a period of time __

3   people trying to impress others by talking about the places they have visited __

4   the desire of travellers not to be considered tourists __

5   not relying on one particular source of information about a place __

  5

 

 KEY

Grammar, Vocabulary, and Pronunciation

GRAMMAR

1   1   to contact

2   talking

3   to think

4   to ring

5   took

6   have waited

7   had

8   won’t hear

9   to have

10   asking

11   being

12   have given

2   1   be allowed

2   needn’t have

3   Will

4   start

5   What you need

6   What happened

7   All

8   more and more

9   far

10   Tom’s

11   maths

12   brother’s

3   1   a matter

2   the one

3   Obviously

4   Anyway

5   seems to have

6   seemed

7   looks

8   felt

9   not

10   so

11   but

12   have

13   so

14   such

15   so much

16   such a lot

Vocabulary

4   1   civil war

2   premiere

3   along

4   a blister

5   osteopath

6   picturesque

7   fur

8   figs

9   stride

10   laugh

5   1   wounded

2   big screen

3   second-hand

4   wind

5   overrated

6   grumpy

7   stable

8   compromise

9   ripe

10   widen

6   1   treaty

2   sniper

3   top / it

4   to

5   into

6   cut

7   straw

8   birds

9   scrambled

10   laughing

7   1   lead

2   plot

3   stub

4   prematurely

5   devalued

6   specialist

7   track

8   fussy

9   entirely

10   sit-ups

Pronunciation

8   1   saucepan

2   ribs

3   siege

4   wild

5   simmer

6   ceasefire

7   straw

8   joke

9   protect

10   bark

9   1   capture

2   defeat

3   refugee

4   antibiotics

5   stubborn

6   postpone

7   holiday

8   captivity

9   mussels

10   turkey

Reading and Writing

Reading

1   1   C

2   A

3   B

4   C

5   A

6   A

7   C

8   B

9   C

10   A

2   1   D

2   C

3   B

4   A

5   D

A TRAVELLER OR A TOURIST?

A  What is the difference between a traveller and a tourist? Well, the easy distinction often made concerns what kind of trip people are on. (1) To put it simply, someone visiting other countries with a backpack and roaming from place to place without a fixed itinerary is often regarded, especially by themselves, as a ‘traveller’. Someone on holiday, especially someone on a package holiday for one or two weeks, is generally regarded as a ‘tourist’. According to this distinction, the traveller gains an understanding of the place as it really is, mixing in with the locals, learning about the culture, whereas the tourist merely skates over the surface, seeing the sights but ignoring the people and their culture. (2) This is why many people who consider themselves ‘travellers’ sneer dismissively at ‘tourists’ and are so anxious to distance themselves from them.

B  However, this distinction does not seem to me to hold water in many cases. First of all, let’s accept that a traveller is someone who fully experiences the place they visit rather than simply observing it from the outside, as a tourist does. Does everyone calling themselves a traveller really do this? Of course not. There are herds of young backpackers out there in all corners of the world (4) who see and learn very little of the places they visit. Sticking together in groups, their tales on return are seldom of what they learnt of other cultures but of the other backpackers they met. Contact with local people is negligible, and there is the suspicion that they are merely ticking boxes so that they can say they have visited all the places that their peers go to. (5) This seems to me not to distinguish them at all from the package tourists boasting about the places they have been to, but who the backpackers so deride. Secondly, (6) there are plenty of people much older than the backpackers who do immerse themselves in the cultures of the places they visit, even if they are only on short holidays. It’s not about how long your stay is, how old you are, how you got there, or how you move around there. It’s all about attitude.

C  If you really are a traveller, there’s a purpose to your trip beyond simply getting away from work, taking it easy or enjoying the weather. (8) You broaden your mind, see other people’s lives through their eyes, gain new perspectives. You meet and have real conversations with local people. You learn that some of your expectations and assumptions were wrong. Your trip has an effect of you. You are wiser about another culture, other ways of thinking and living. A tourist, on the other hand, isn’t interested in any of that. Tourists hardly engage at all with the place they are visiting, preferring to confirm their own preconceptions rather than challenge them, keeping the local people and culture at arm’s length, seeing everything through the lens of a camera.

D  One of the first rules of being a traveller is that you have to accept the place for what it is. (9) Don’t complain that it’s hot, that there are bugs, that life moves at a different pace, that local people sometimes stare at you. Don’t keep comparing the place with home or other places you’ve been. Don’t let disappointments about the quality of service or level of facilities in your accommodation dominate your thoughts. Instead, get out and about. Watch how local people interact, how they go about their daily business. Learn some words of the language that you can use in shops and other places and go where the local people go. Ask questions rather than thinking you know all the answers. Once you’ve found the various bits of key information you need, leave the guidebook behind – you’ll learn more from personal contact and direct experience than you can get from any book. Put the camera away for a while and instead store images of what you see in your mind. Anyone can do these things, no matter what kind of trip they’re on. Even if you’re on a short annual holiday, you can be a traveller rather than a tourist; plenty of people who call themselves travellers are actually tourists. It’s all in the mind.

 

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