Posted by: crisdiaz24 | February 8, 2012

LOST IN TRANSLATION – VOCABULARY

LOST IN TRANSLATION

Lost in translation: It is when something is translated into another language, and sometimes translated back into the original language, and because of differences of the languages some of the original meaning is lost.
Lowly: low in position and importance, or not respected. Humilde.
To underestimate: to fail to guess or understand the real cost, size, difficulty, etc. of something. To fail to understand how strong, skilful, intelligent or determined someone, especially a competitor is.
To hover: to stay in one place in the air, usually by moving the wings quickly. To stand somewhere, especially near another person, eagerly or nervously waiting for their attention. Cernerse, planear.
To make a difference TO
Flow: (especially of liquids, gases or electricity) to move in one direction, especially continuously and easily.
Opening lines: opening line – the first line of a piece of writing (as a newspaper story).
Wind-up: (n)A deceptive or provocative act.
Potful: a pot full of sthg. Pot:     any of various types of container, usually round, especially one used for cooking food.
Along: with you.
Magpie: a bird with black and white feathers and a long tail. Magpies are attracted to small shiny objects which they carry away to their nests. Urraca.
To sanction: to formally permit something.
Neatly: in a tidy way. Carefully.
Staccato: describes a noise or way of speaking that consists of a series of short and separate sounds.
Former: the first of two people, things or groups previously mentioned.
Wide: describes something that includes a large amount or many different types of thing, or that covers a large range or area.
Countless: very many; too many to be counted.
To be besotted with: to be completely in love and therefore likely to behave in an unusual way or be foolish.
Quirky: unusual in an attractive and interesting way. Extravagante, estrafalario.
Controversial: causing disagreement or discussion.
Arguably: possibly.
To churn out: to produce large amounts of something quickly, usually something of low quality.
Major: more important, bigger or more serious than others of the same type.
Throughout: in every part, or during the whole period of time.
Awkward: difficult to use, do, or deal with.
To skip: to not do or not have something that you usually do or that you should do; to avoid.
The likes of: the type of people mentioned. A similar kind.
Bland: lacking a strong taste or character or lacking in interest or energy. Soso, insulso, anodino.
Smooth: having a surface or substance which is perfectly regular and has no holes, lumps or areas that rise or fall suddenly.
Lawn: an area of grass, especially near to a house or in a park, which is cut regularly to keep it short.
To mow: to cut plants, such as grass or wheat, which have long thin stems and grow close together.
Distortion: A statement that twists fact; a misrepresentation. The mistake of misrepresenting the facts.
To remark: to give a spoken statement of an opinion or thought.
Barely: by the smallest amount; almost not.
To set out to: to start an activity with a particular aim.
Faithful: true or not changing any of the details, facts, style, etc. of the original.
Masterwork: a work of art such as a painting, film or book which is done or made with great skill, and is often a person’s greatest work.
To blow wide open: To put an end to the debate. To make something that someone is trying to achieve fail completely, often by telling people something which should have been a secret
To shorten: to become shorter or to make something shorter.
To boast: to speak too proudly or happily about what you have done or what you own.


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