Posted by: crisdiaz24 | October 10, 2012

STRAIGHTFORWARD ADVANCED VOCABULARY UNIT 3 A

UNIT 3 A

To fritter away: to waste time or money on things that are not important.

To set aside: to save or keep money or time for a particular purpose.

To squander: (on sby/sthg) to waste money, time, etc. in a stupid or careless way.

To run up: to allow a bill, debt, etc. to reach a large total.

To pay off: to finish paying money owed for sthg.

Lavishly: extravagantly, luxuriously.

Cautionary: giving advice or a warning.

Morality tale: a type of play that was popular in the 15th and 16th centuries and was intended to teach a moral lesson, using characters to represent good and bad qualities.

Busker: sby who performs music in a public place and ask for money from people passing by. Músico callejero.

Dough: (old-fashioned, slang) money.

Purse: (especially BrE) a small bag made of leather, plastic, etc. for carrying coins and often also paper money, cards, etc., used especially by women.

To bail sby out: to pay sby’s bail for them. Bail: money that sb agrees to pay if a person accused of a crime does not appear at their trial. When bail has been arranged, the accused person is allowed to go free until the trial.

To plead for: (with sby) (for sthg) to ask sby for sthg in a very strong and serious way.

A stroke of genius: unusually great intelligence, skill or artistic ability. Una genialidad.

To hand over: to give sthg/sby officially or formally to another person.

To cut up: to divide sthg into small pieces with a knife, etc.

Rolled into one: combined in one person or thing.

To plough through: to make slow progress through sthg difficult or boring especially a book, a report, etc.

To have sby on: (informal) to try to make sby believe sthg that is not true, usually as a joke.

Guileless: (formal) behaving in a very honest way; not knowing how to trick people

Wide-eyed: having little experience and therefore very willing to believe, trust or accept sby/sthg. Naïve.

Hick: (informal, especially NAmE) a person from the country who is considered to be stupid and to have little experience of life. Paleto.

Anything but: definitely not.

Bimbo: (informal, disapproving) a young person, usually a woman, who is sexually attractive but not very intelligent.

Nonetheless: despite this fact, nevertheless.

To snap: to suddenly be unable to control your feelings any longer because the situation has become too difficult.

Panic-stricken: extremely anxious about sthg, in a way that prevents you from thinking clearly. Hysterical.

Binge: (informal) a short period of time when sb does too much of a particular activity, especially eating or drinking alcohol.

To be in over sby’s head: too difficult or complicated for sby to understand. Estaba en una situación que me superaba.

Bankruptcy:  insolvency.

This sucks: (slang) used to say that sthg is very bad.

To spot: (not used in the progressive tenses) to see or notice a person or thing, especially suddenly or when it is not easy to do so.

To pin: to attach sthg onto another thing or fasten things together with a pin, etc.

Seed: (of sthg) the beginning of a feeling or a development which continues to grow.

Bottom line: the most important thing that you have to consider or accept; the essential point in a discussion, etc.

Buck: (informal) a US, Australian or New Zealand dollar.

To banish: to make sby/sthg go away; to get rid of sby/sthg.

Plea: an urgent emotional request.

Word-of-mouth: because people tell each other and not because they read about it.

Stack: a pile of sthg, usually neatly arranged.

Abusive: rude and offensive; criticizing rudely and unfairly.

To bump into: (informal) to meet sby by chance.

Panhandling: asking for money in the street.

To take offence: the act of getting upset or feeling insulted.

Chuckle: (at / about sthg) to laugh quietly.

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