Posted by: a2cristina | May 21, 2019

Traveler Vs Tourist – Vocabulary

 

 

TRAVELLER OR TOURIST (UNIT 8B)

 

BUM: an idle person.

CAMPER: a person who goes camping.

COMFY: comfortable.

CULTURE VULTURE: a person who is very interested in the arts.

MUSEUM HOPPING: to visit a lot of museums.

PAMPERED: treated with excessive care and attention. Spoilt.

SEAWEED: sea plants.

SLICKER: an urban person.

SPOT: a little; a small amount.

TO GO WHERE THE WIND BLOWS: to move without planning or thinking.

TO MEANDER: to wander, to wind, to turn.

TO RAMBLE: to move aimlessly from place to place, with no specific direction.

 

Travelers vs Tourists

Travelers and tourists are both people who travel to different locations. The difference is that they have different connotations and that one is a broader term than the other. All tourists are travelers, but not all travelers are tourists.

The word ‘traveler’ simply means someone who travels. ‘Travelling’ itself means going from one place to the other, but it most often means going on a long journey. It isn’t very common to describe yourself as travelling when all you’re doing is going to get groceries. In the UK and Ireland, it can also mean someone who leads a nomadic lifestyle, always moving from place to place. ‘Tourist’, on the other hand, is a very specific word. It means someone who temporarily travels to another location just to enjoy the new place.

When describing people who travel to other countries, there are a few categories they can fall into. Some people have to travel for business, such as when they go to have a conference. Other people go to a place in transit. For instance, someone who wants to go from the US to Tibet would probably have to change planes in China. They would be travelling to China, but it wouldn’t be their final destination. Other people will go to places for charitable work, such as helping out with relief and aid after a major disaster. The last category is travelling for pleasure. This can mean anything from going to another country to enjoy the landscape to going to a theme park or tourist trap.

Tourists are specifically people who go to another place for pleasure when that’s the main goal of the trip. If a businessman were to take some time on his trip to experience the landscape of the place he’s in, then he wouldn’t be a tourist, since that wasn’t the purpose of the trip. Someone who travels for pleasure and takes some time to do some business work would be a tourist.

There are some who divide people who go somewhere for pleasure into travelers and tourists. According to those definitions, tourists are shallow people who care more about boasting that they were in a place than actually experiencing it, while travelers are people who blaze new trails and experience a much deeper connection with a place by going to the exact same attractions that the tourists go to, but more deeply. This is because the people who created this definition are all self-described travelers.

Tourism has gained a bit of a bad reputation. Some tourists will go to places and become a nuisance. For instance, in the United States, the Quileute reservation was damaged by tourists, though that is an extreme example. Other people will act like the stereotype of tourists. However, the majority of tourists do not – it is just far more common to hear about the horror stories than about the people who don’t do anything worth complaining about. Still, because of those people, some don’t want to be associated with the word ‘tourist’ even if they are doing the exact same things a tourist does.

It could be argued that the two words mean different approaches to travelling abroad: tourists want to have a good time with the “normal” travelling activities while travelers have fun by experiencing the culture. There’s nothing wrong with either mindset, because they’re just personal preferences.

To summarize, travelers are people who go to somewhere else. Tourists are people who go to another place to have fun. Some people prefer not to be called tourists, however, because they do not want to be associated with tourists who have behaved badly in the past.

http://www.differencebetween.net/language/difference-between-travelers-and-tourists/

Posted by: a2cristina | May 21, 2019

THE GIN EPIDEMIC – Cloze Test

 

 

CLOZE TEST

Read the text and complete the chart below with a word from the list that comes after the text. Every word can only be used ONCE. There are FIVE words that you do not need to use. Question 0 has been answered as an example.

 

THE GIN EPIDEMIC

Distillation was common 0) __________ Europe by the Middle Ages, but was fairly uncommon in England, compared to beer and ale production, because a national monopoly kept prices very high. In 1689, Parliament banned imports of French wines and spirits and at the same time cancelled the 1) __________ monopoly. Subsequently, anyone who could pay the required 2) __________ could set up a distillery business. Not only 3) __________ distillers become producers, but also sellers. The cost of gin fell below the cost of beer and ale and gin drinking became the favourite alcoholic beverage among the ‘inferior class’.

British statistical abstracts put the annual 4) __________ of gin in England and Wales in 1700 at about 1.23 million gallons. By 1714, consumption was up to almost 2 million gallons per year. By 1735, it was 6.4 million gallons, and by 1751, 7.05 million gallons. In terms of population, per capita intake increased by up to 5) __________ from between 1 and 2 pints in 1700 to between 8 and 9 pints, about a gallon per person, in 1751.  Beer drinking for the same period remained relatively constant at 3 million gallons a year.

George, one of the most influential historians of the early 20th century, blamed the increase in gin consumption 6) __________ much of the social problems, which also increased during this period. The most commonly cited support for this argument was that, after the passage of the Tippling [1]Act of 1751, which George called a ‘7) __________ point in the social history of London, social 8) __________ declined. The Tippling Act prohibited distillers from selling gin at 9) __________, and levied severe penalties for non-compliance, such as imprisonment, whipping and even deportation for repeat offenders. As a result, gin prices rose, gin drinking steadily declined back to 2 million gallons [the intake of beer, however, steadily increased to about 4 million gallons a year and social agitation did decline. However, the social turmoil 10) _________ to and after the Tippling Act was the result of, and was fuelled and exacerbated by, excessive gin drinking, rather than having been its cause.

 

Adapted from: https://academic.oup.com/alcalc/article/36/5/401/233726

 

CONSUMPTION     DOMESTIC                HOUSEHOLD            TROUBLE

CONSUMER             DUTIES                       PRIOR                         TURNING

DECISIVE                   EIGHTFOLD               RETAIL                        UNREST

DID                              FOR                              THROUGHOUT        WHOLESALE

 

 

0 THROUGHOUT    
1 6
2 7
3 8
4 9
5 10

 

 

[1] To tipple: to  drink alcohol habitually

 

KEY

 

0. THROUGHOUT

  1. DOMESTIC
  2. DUTIES
  3. DID
  4. CONSUMPTION
  5. EIGHTFORLD
  6. FOR
  7. TURNING
  8. UNREST
  9. RETAIL
  10. PRIOR
Posted by: a2cristina | May 19, 2019

INTERESTING AND USEFUL WEBSITE

 

Click on the folliwng link to get access to different skills, such as listening, vocabulary, etc.

https://hablaidiomaseoi.weebly.com/english.html

Posted by: a2cristina | May 18, 2019

FECHAS DE LOS EXÁMENES DE PROMOCIÓN DE FIN DE CURSO

Podéis consultar en la página web de la Escuela de Idiomas de Santander las fechas de los exámenes de PROMOCIÓN de los cursos 1 en mayo:

Exámenes de Promoción de Mayo

USUALLY – USED TO – BE / GET USED TO + -ING

 

  1. Did you find it hard to get used to coming to the EOI every two days when you started studying here?
  2. Is it difficult for you to get used to changing our clocks forward in March or back in October?
  3. How long does it take you to get used to using a new mobile / a new app?
  4. What activities did you use to do when you were a teenager?
  5. Is it / Was it hard for you to get used to reading eBooks?
  6. Are you used to waking up early? What time do you usually wake up?
  7. Do you think it is difficult to get used to the weather in Northern Spain? Would it be more difficult to get used to living in the south?
  8. Are you used to staying up late? If not, would it be difficult for you to get used to going to bed late at night? What time do you usually go to bed?
  9. What is the most difficult thing to get used to in times of recession? How do you usually try to save money?
  10. Do you live on your own? If not, would it be difficult for you to get used to living alone?
  11. What would be the hardest thing to get used to if you were to move house?
  12. Do you usually commute to school or work every day?
  13. Are you used to working in a team?
  14. Do you think it is difficult to get used to speaking in public?
Posted by: a2cristina | May 9, 2019

USED TO, TO BE USED TO, TO GET USED TO

USED TO, TO BE USED TO, TO GET USED TO

 

Fill in the gaps with either USED TO, or the correct form of TO BE USED TO, TO GET USED TO + the verb, if necessary, in the appropriate form.

 

  1. When I was a child I ________________ (go) swimming in the lake.
  2. I _______________ (speak) in front of an audience. I am a teacher.
  3. As a father I _______________ (clean) up the mess my children make every evening.
  4. “Oh dear. I’ve never driven such a powerful car before”. “Don’t worry, you’ll soon _______________ it.
  5. “Don’t you play tennis?” “Oh, I ________________ , but I haven’t practised for ages.”
  6. When I was in the army I _______________ (get) up at six every morning.
  7. “Why did you give up your job just after the new boss took over?” “I just _______________ (work) under so much pressure.”
  8. My grandmother _______________ (walk) five miles to go to church on Sundays.
  9. “It must be really hard to get up at five every morning.” “Oh, not really. I _______________ it by now.”
  10. I _______________ (read) the paper after lunch. That’s one of the things I really enjoy.
  11. In Spain you will soon _______________ (take) a siesta in the afternoon.
  12. “I hear Roger was really shocked when he first started work for the murder squad.” “Yes, but he _______________ the job in the end.”
  13. On holiday in Finland my wife _______________ (take) a sauna every day.
  14. “I thought you didn’t like opera.” “Well, I _______________ but I really enjoy it now.
  15. “I don’t think I’ll ever understand this new computer program!” “Well, there’s no rush. Give yourself a month to _______________ it.
  16. “Have you noticed how many people drink bottled mineral water these days?” “Strange, isn’t it? No-one ever _______________ when I was a lad.”
  17. “Did Gerry enjoy his time in the army?” “Not really. He never could _______________ (obey) orders.”

 

KEY

  1. When I was a child I USED TO (go) swimming in the lake.
  2. I AM USED TO SPEAKING (speak) in front of an audience. I am a teacher.
  3. As a father I AM USED TO CLEANING (clean) up the mess my children make every evening.
  4. “Oh dear. I’ve never driven such a powerful car before”. “Don’t worry, you’ll soon GET USED TO it.
  5. “Don’t you play tennis?” “Oh, I USED TO, but I haven’t practised for ages.”
  6. When I was in the army I USED TO GET (get) up at six every morning.
  7. “Why did you give up your job just after the new boss took over?” “I just WASN’T USED TO WORKING (work) under so much pressure.”
  8. My grandmother IS USED TO WALKING(walk) five miles to go to church on Sundays.
  9. “It must be really hard to get up at five every morning.” “Oh, not really. I AM USED TO / HAVE GOT USED TO it by now.”
  10. I AM USEDTO READING (read) the paper after lunch. That’s one of the things I really enjoy.
  11. In Spain you will soon GET USED TO TAKING (take) a siesta in the afternoon.
  12. “I hear Roger was really shocked when he first started work for the murder squad.” “Yes, but he GOT USED TO the job in the end.”
  13. On holiday in Finland my wife USED TO  (take) a sauna every day.
  14. “I thought you didn’t like opera.” “Well, I DIDN’T USE TO but I really enjoy it now.
  15. “I don’t think I’ll ever understand this new computer program!” “Well, there’s no rush. Give yourself a month to GET USED TO it.
  16. “Have you noticed how many people drink bottled mineral water these days?” “Strange, isn’t it? No-one ever USED TO when I was a lad.”
  17. “Did Gerry enjoy his time in the army?” “Not really. He never could GET USED TO OBEYING (obey) orders.”

 

Posted by: a2cristina | May 9, 2019

Best and Worst Cities for commuters – Cloze Test

Read the text and complete the chart below with a word from the list that comes after the text. Every word can only be used ONCE. There are FIVE words that you do not need to use. Question 0 has been answered as an example.

 

 

BEST AND WORST CITIES FOR COMMUTERS

The perfect commute is easy, inexpensive and reliable.

In cities 0) __________ such factors, like Buffalo, N.Y., Salt Lake City and Milwaukee, the trip to work is a breeze. But for commuters in Atlanta, Detroit and Miami, the daily grind is just that, thanks to bad traffic, 1) __________ infrastructure and drivers who resist car pools and public transportation.

Other 2) __________ that came out on top include Oklahoma City, Okla., Pittsburgh, Corpus Christi, Texas, and Eugene, Ore. At the bottom: Orlando, Fla., Dallas, Birmingham, Ala., and Raleigh, N.C.

To find them and others, Forbes.com looked at the 75 largest metro areas in the U.S. and evaluated them based on traffic 3) __________, travel times and how efficiently commuters use existing infrastructure, based on data from the Texas Transportation Institute and the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2006 American Community Survey. The worst commutes were those that 4) __________ up the most hours and were the least reliable. The best commutes were in cities with short, 5) __________ treks to the office, where fellow commuters efficiently use transit options to reduce 6) __________.

Varying population densities and development patterns in the nation’s cities make gauging efficiency difficult. In Boston, for example, jobs are mostly concentrated in and around the city center. In Los Angeles, offices are more 7) __________ out. That means Boston’s commuter rail is better able to put area commuters 8) __________ to their jobs than an identical train system could do for Los Angeles commuters.

Public transport systems work best when they limit traffic jams by taking cars 9)__________ the road, and thus reducing delays, travel time and increasing the predictability of a commute. Since carpooling [1]can often accomplish the same feat, we measured a city’s commuting efficiency by adding the number of people who carpool, those who take public transport and those who walk to work, and divided the sum by the city’s total number of 10) __________, based on Census Bureau figures.

Boston scores a 23% by this measure, and Los Angeles checks in at 20%. In San Francisco, an extremely efficient city, 28% of the commuters take public transit, walk or carpool, while inefficient Kansas City, Mo., scores 12% by this measure.

Adapted from: Matt Woolsey © Forbes

 

 

 

 

ATE                              COMMUTERS          FARTHER                   SPOTS

BOASTING                CONGESTION          INSUFFICIENT         SPREAD

CANCELLATIONS    DELAYS                       OFF                              UNRELIABLE

CLOSER                      DEPENDABLE           OUT OF                      WASTED

 

 

0 BOASTING    
1 6
2 7
3 8
4 9
5 10

 

 

 

 

 

[1] CAR POOL:  a group of people who travel together, especially to work or school, usually in a different member’s car each day.

 

KEY

 

0. BOASTING

  1. INSUFFICIENT
  2. SPOTS
  3. DELAYS
  4. ATE
  5. DEPENDABLE
  6. CONGESTION
  7. SPREAD
  8. CLOSER
  9. OFF
  10. COMMUTERS

Click on the following link to get access to a list of different verb structures:

 

List of verbs followed by inf and ing

VERBS THAT CAN BE FOLLOWED EITHER BY AN INFINITIVE OR AN –ING FORM

 

TO REMEMBER

  • + -ing = To mean the action comes before remembering. I remember going to the bank, but nothing after that.
  • + Infinitive = to mean that remembering comes before the action described. Remember to take your hat when you go out.

 

TO TRY

  • + -ing = to say that we test sth to see if it improves a situation. I tried taking some aspirin, but the pain didn’t go away.
  • + Inf. = to say that we attempt to do sth. I tried to get the table through the door, but it was too big.

 

TO STOP

  • + -ing= to say what it is that we stop doing. They stopped laughing when Malcolm walked into the room.
  • + Inf.= To say why we stop doing sth. She stopped to make a cup of tea.

 

TO GO ON

  • + -ing= to continue doing sth. Although she asked him to stop, he went on tapping his pen on the table.
  • + Inf.= To mean that sth is done after sth else is finished. You do it after you have finished doing something else. After the interval, Pavarotti went on to sing an aria from Tosca.

 

TO FORGET

  • + -ing= to mean that you don’t remember sth that you did in the past. I shall never forget going to the cinema for the first time in my life.
  • + Inf.= To mean you must remember to do sth in the future. Don’t forget to post the letter..

 

TO MEAN

  • + -ing= to say that sth has sth else as a result. If we want to get there by 7.00, that means getting up before 5.00.
  • + Inf.= To say that we intend(ed) to do sth. I meant to phone you last week.

 

TO COME

  • + -ing= to say that sby moves in the way that is described. He came hurrying up the path.
  • + -Inf.= To talk about a gradual change. After some years, they came to accept her as an equal.

 

TO REGRET

  • + -ing= to say we have already done sth that we are not happy about. It’s too late now, but I’ll always regret asking John to do the work.
  • + Inf.= To say that we are about to do sth we are not happy about. I regret to inform you that your application has been unsuccessful.

 

SPEAKING

 

  1. Talk about something you have tried to do but couldn’t.
  2. What different activities do you remember doing two days ago?
  3. What must you remember to do this evening?
  4. Talk about things in your past you will never forget.
  5. What can’t you forget to do this week?
  6. Do you have any regrets in relation with your past? What would you change if you still had the chance?
  7. Have you come to accept some kinds of behaviour you didn’t before?
  8. What kind of things did you mean to do last week that you did not do?
Posted by: a2cristina | May 7, 2019

What should they do? Speaking Activity

WHAT SHOULD THEY DO?

 

In pairs, make up suggestions or recommendations to try and help the following people.

For example:

  1. John has an exam tomorrow but he is not feeling well.

I suggest he should take a tablet, go to bed and relax.

  1. Claudia’s child is running an extremely high temperature.
  2. Joe has problems getting to sleep at night.
  3. Sue cannot drive but would like to.
  4. Some tourists want to go pub crawling in Santander.
  5. An English friend of yours, Geoff, would like to go to a football match in Spain.
  6. Your partner feels he / she is not ready to take the exam at the end of May.
  7. Mary has won €100,000 on the lottery.
  8. Your best friend would like to give up smoking.
  9. Your teacher wants to learn German.

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