Posted by: crisdiaz24 | May 7, 2016

CINEMA AND TV SPOLERS – Homework for the 10th May

CINEMA AND TV SPOILERS

 

Fill in the gaps a to g with the sentences or clauses 1 to 7 listed after the text.

 

Everyone’s been there – you’ve saved a TV show to watch later but before you’ve had a chance to get to it, someone’s revealed what happened.

Welcome to the world of the spoiler.

  1. ______________________

Take the new series of Game of Thrones as an example.

The first episode of series six was shown at 9pm on America’s east coast on Sunday night and at 2am UK time.

But most people will probably watch the 9pm Monday night episode on Sky Atlantic – or later this week on their tablet/phone/TV.

So on your way into work, university or school, you may have heard or seen something you really didn’t want to…

Before 1971, the word spoiler did not mean anything.

Its dictionary definition is: “A description of an important plot development in a television show, film, or book b. ______________________ .”

And it was cinema audiences watching Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho in 1969 who started ruining the film’s storyline for each other.

An article written about the film, and other ruined endings, was called “Spoilers”.

Cinema

  1. ______________________

There’s the famous father/son one from Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back from way back in 1980. If you haven’t seen it yet, tough.

There are plenty of others like Donnie Darko, Fight Club, Seven, The Talented Mr Ripley and Shutter Island.

And then there’s the biggie – the ending to The Usual Suspects from 1995.

You would have been pretty angry (Hulk angry) if someone ruined this one for you back in the day.

The Internet

Then in the mid-1990s, the internet gave birth to the “newsgroup” conversation.

  1. ______________________

And in the early days of the web it was all too easy to see a storyline from a show without meaning to.

Fast forward to 2010, the era of online articles, and there was a massive backlash after a US journalist failed to put a spoiler alert in a story about the fourth season of Mad Men, which ruined the surprise for many fans.

Social media

Then, with the advent of social media, spoilers went into overdrive.

  1. ______________________

Add that to the broadcast delays of many US shows in the UK and it all leads to storylines leaking out early.

Remember all those Breaking Bad spoilers?

If you’re a fan of The Good Wife, Scandal, How To Get Away With Murder, etc. you’ll know what we’re talking about.

  1. ______________________ with shows like House of Cards and Orange is the New Black available immediately in their entirety.

Apps that filter spoilers

So if you want to avoid spoilers – basically stay off Twitter or Facebook. Or Snapchat or Instagram. Basically throw your phone away.

  1. ______________________

Search for TVShow Time’s Google Chrome extension or Netflix’s spoilerfoiler.com.

In Tweetdeck you can also filter certain words so they don’t appear on your timeline.

Alternatively – just read a book or stick your fingers in your ears if you don’t want to hear what happens in the next Star Wars film just yet.

 

 

  1. After Psycho came decades of films with plot twists which people couldn’t help spoiling for other people.
  2. And things got even murkier from about 2007 onwards when box sets and streaming services like Netflix started becoming popular.

 

  1. If you can’t, there are various filters and extensions you can download.

 

  1. It’s not a new phenomenon (Formula 1 and Match of the Day fans have been angry with news organisations broadcasting results for years) but we seem to be angrier than ever about spoilers.

 

  1. That’s where people would talk to each other about various topics online – including their favourite programme or film.

 

  1. which if previously known may reduce surprise or suspense for a first-time viewer or reader

 

  1. With thousands of articles about every detail of a show being ripped apart and examined, it’s impossible to miss what’s happened in some storylines.

KEY

 

a. 4

b. 6

c. 1

d. 5

e. 7

f. 2

g. 3


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